May 7th, 2020 Daily Devotional

I’ve decided that there's something about the efficiency and openness and

emotional complexity of poetry that seems especially made for a time when

I find it harder to focus for a long stretch of reading, my thoughts are a bit

more jumbled, and my emotions are so disparate.

Denise Levertov is a poet who was introduced to me in seminary. This

poem of hers is titled "Making Peace":

A voice from the dark called out,

"The poet must give us

imagination of peace, to oust the intense, familiar

imagination of disaster. Peace, not only

the absence of war.'

But peace, like a poem,

is not there ahead of itself,

can't be imagined before it is made,

can't be known except

in the words of its own making,

grammar of justice,

syntax of mutual aid.

A feeling towards it,

dimly sensing a rhythm, is all we have

until we begin to utter its metaphors,

learning them as we speak.

A line of peace might appear

if we restructured the sentence our lives are making,

revoked its reaffirmation of profit and power,

questioned our needs, allowed

long pauses . . .

A cadence of peace might balance its weight

on that different fulcrum; peace, a presence,

an energy field more intense than war,

might pulse then,

stanza by stanza into the world,

each act of living

one of its words, each word

a vibration of light--facets

of the forming crystal.

-Denise Levertov

I'm challenged by the idea that peace is not something "ahead of itself"--not

known until it is made. And then this:

A line of peace might appear

if we restructured the sentence our lives are making,

revoked its reaffirmation of profit and power,

questioned our needs, allowed

long pauses . . .


This pandemic is exposing so many ways that we've reaffirmed profit and

power in the collective sentences of our lives--and so many people are

suffering. What do we need to restructure now so that going forward a line

of peace might appear? How does this "long pause" give us the opportunity

to truly bring peace, stanza by stanza, by each act of our living, into the

world for everyone?


Let us pray, using poetic words from our hymnal (the Prayer of St. Francis):

Make me a channel of your peace.

Where there is hatred, let me bring your love.

Where there is injury, your pardon, Lord,

and where there's doubt, true faith in you.

Amen.

Recent Posts

See All

November 3, 2020 Daily Devotional

Psalm 147:3 "God heals the brokenhearted, and binds up their wounds." Tomorrow is All Saints' Day. So many this year are mourning the loss of loved ones. I want to share this blessing by John O'Donohu

Address

5 Caroline Avenue

Setauket, NY 11733

Contact

Email: setauketpresbyterian@verizon.net
Tel: (631) 941-4271

Follow us

  • Facebook
  • Instagram

© 2020 Setauket Presbyterian Church